Categories
Corrosive Drywall

Domestic Drywall Problems Resemble Chinese Drywall

There is a lot of evidence that Chinese drywall can cause serious environmental and health problems. Recent reports suggest that some American-made or domestic drywall also poses the same risks. However, unlike with Chinese drywall, scientists are still trying to determine whether domestic drywall has deleterious effects on health and property.

What are the purported problems with domestic drywall?

There are reports out of the southeastern states that indicate a potentially growing problem with domestic drywall. There are many Florida homes built between 2005 and 2008 that contain potentially corrosive domestic drywall. It seems to corrode plumbing fixtures, copper wiring, appliances and air condition units. Some homeowners have reported smoke alarm malfunction, tarnishing of silverware and pitted metal surfaces.

Moreover, exposure to domestic drywall may cause health problems for homeowners. Such problems include:

  • Labored breathing
  • Nose bleeds
  • Liver and kidney disease
  • Seizure
  • Stoke
  • Delirium
  • Light headedness
  • Headaches
  • Tumors and cysts

What might be causing domestic drywall to be a risk to property and health?

Some independent laboratory reports suggest that high levels of sulfide gas are coming out of the domestic drywall in homes. This “off-gassing” phenomenon may be connected to the presence of synthetic gypsum. This is a byproduct of the scrubbing process that removes sulfur dioxide from the emissions of coal-fired plants. Off-gassing of sulfide gas is more prevalent in homes built in the southeast possibly because of the high humidity there.

Categories
Corrosive Drywall

The Problems Associated With Chinese Drywall

In late 2008 and 2009, Florida homeowners began to notice foul sulfur odors in their homes. Upon further inspection, they discovered the odors were emanating from their drywall, a material used to construct interior walls. Soon, homeowners in other states noticed the odors as well as reports of problems with their air conditioners, corroded electrical wiring, and browning of their silverware. Many complained of sinus problems, headaches and bloody noses.

Inspectors and researchers traced the drywall to Chinese imports and to gypsum mines in China. Since many of the complaints began to surface when the U.S. housing market began to collapse, Chinese officials suggested that domestic drywall manufacturers were seizing upon the reports to denigrate their product and to lay blame for suffering domestic sales on the imported products.